Holliday Grainger Set As Female Lead In BBC One’s ‘The Cormoran Strike Mysteries’

holliday-graingerBBC One has found their Robin.

Holliday Grainger has been set as the female lead in The Cormoran Strike Mysteries, which is based on the Strike series of novels by J.K. Rowling (writing under the pen name Robert Galbraith).

Grainger, whose previous TV credits include Showtime’s The Borgias and A+E Networks’ Bonnie & Clyde miniseries, will play Robin Ellacott, who serves as part assistant/part-partner to war veteran turned private investigator Cormoran Strike. As TVWise previously reported, Tom Burke has been cast as Strike.

“I’m thrilled to be joining the talented creative team behind The Strike Series, especially with the role of Robin Ellacott”, Holliday Grainger said in a statement. “Her grounded strength and intelligence is going to be a joy to explore. I can’t wait to dive straight into the wit and grit of Strike’s cannily well observed London.”

JK Rowling“I couldn’t be more delighted about the casting of Holliday Grainger, who brought my Robin to perfect onscreen life during her audition”, added original author and The Cormoran Strike Mysteries executive producer J.K. Rowling. “We’ve now secured two superb actors in the lead roles and I think they will create something very special together.”

The Cormoran Strike Mysteries consists of three event dramas, which are adaptations of the first three Strike novels. Three-parter The Cuckoo’s Calling and two-part drama The Silkworm are being adapted by Ben Richards; while Career Of Evil has been adapted as a two-part drama by Tom Edge (The Last Dragon Slayer).

JK Rowling’s production company Brontë Film & TV is producing with filming set to begin in London this month. Jackie Larkin is the series producer, while Michael Keillor will direct. J.K Rowling, her long-time agent Neil Blair and Ruth Kenley-Letts executive produce for Brontë Film & TV. The BBC’s Elizabeth Kilgarriff will also serve as an executive producer. HBO has taken rights to The Cormoran Strike Mysteries in both the United States and Canada.