BBC Orders Raft Of Tudor Factual Programmes As Companion Pieces To ‘Wolf Hall’

Category : News, UK News
Wolf Hall (1)

BBC Two and BBC Four is set to explore the Tudor age.

The BBC has commissioned four separate factual programmes about the Tudors – two for BBC Two and two for BBC Four – which the corporation said would both mark the 500th anniversary of Hampton Court Palace and compliment their adaptation of Hillary Mantell novels Wolf Hall and Bring Up The Bodies, which will be airing around the same time.

The four factual programmes feature such talent as Lucy Worsley, David Starkey, Waldemar Januszczak, Dr Suzannah Lipscomb and Michael Wood; and explores the art and culture of the Tudor era and taking viewers deeper into the reality of life in the Tudor world.

“As BBC Two airs its landmark drama Wolf Hall, and with the popularity of Hilary Mantel’s novels capturing a real British appetite for this period of history, BBC Two And BBC Four are offering a complementary collection of art and history films that put the real Tudors firmly in the spotlight”, said Cassian Harrison, Channel Editor of BBC Four.

“This collection of programmes demonstrates how the two channels can work in a unique way to take viewers deeper into the world of the Tudors with BBC Two celebrating the art and culture of the Tudors whilst BBC Four takes viewers deeper into the reality of what life was like in Tudor times”, he added.

Full details of the factual programmes follow below:

BBC Two

A Night At Hampton Court

Produced by BBC Arts in partnership with Historic Royal Palaces, A Night In Hampton Court is presented by Lucy Worsley and David Starkey and sees the duo delve into the events of October 1537, when Henry’s son and heir Edward VI was born, and christened in Hampton Court Palace. The detailed records from the time allow Lucy and David to show how this great celebration used every part of the palace, from the royal apartments to the kitchens to the Chapel Royal.

Holbein: Eye Of The Tudors – A Culture Show Special

This Culture Show special, explores Hans Holbein, who, as Henry VIII’s court painter, witnessed and recorded the most notorious era in English history. He painted most of the major characters of the age, and created the famous image of the King that history still remembers. Waldemar Januszczak delves into both the work and life of the man, asking who he really was, where he came from and what were the dark and unsettling secrets hidden in his art?

BBC Four

Hidden Killers Of The Tudor Home

Hidden Killers Of The Tudor Home hails from Modern TV and sees Dr Suzannah Lipscomb explores how homes evolved in the Tudor age from single room dwellings to multi-room structures, forcing the homebuilders of the day to engineer radical new design solutions and technologies – some of which were lethal. In Tudor houses the threat of a grisly, unpleasant death was never far away in a world, or indeed home, still mired in the grime and filth of the Medieval period.

Mary Arden: A Tudor Life

From Maya Vision, Mary Arden: A Tudor Life explores what real life was like in Tudor England, as opposed to the glamorous version show in scripted productions such as Wolf Hall. The film, presented by Michael Wood, tells the story of a woman touched by new opportunities in society, work and education in a century that saw the birth of England’s cultural and economic greatness.